Untimely Samaritinism

My experience today shows me that perhaps I have retained a few too many of my Kenyan driving habits. Also, interesting things tend to happen around Elbert, like my Japanese hiking trip 2 years ago if you want to read about it.

So I’m in Leadville, Colorado, hiking Mt. Elbert in preparation for my annual Colorado Japanese hiking trip. On the way at around 6:30 in the morning, I see what looks to be a homeless guy hitchhiking. I usually regret not stopping so I decide “what the heck, I’ll pick him up”. I pull over onto the narrow shoulder, look behind to make sure no one is approaching, and wave for him to jump in. He looks grateful, but after attempting the door handle realizes that it’s locked. I fumble around, looking for the unlock button on my parents’ car, before giving up and reaching over to open the handle from the inside. He jumps in and in that tiny 20 second window when no one would have known, I see a policeman’s lights blaring in my rear view mirror. I think “crap, I’ve either been speeding, or I’ve picked up a convicted meth-head criminal who is going to pull a knife on me”, neither option of which sounds particularly appealing.

So I pull over, and the cop suspiciously asks me a bunch of questions about why I picked up a homeless guy. Apparently the cop saw a dead animal down the road, and one of my car’s back lights was busted from someone rear-ending my brother, all of which added to his suspicion. I know he was suspicious because he told me my story didn’t add up… so I told him the same simple story again. I think he was calculating the possibility of some sort of Fargo-esque scenario. I can’t imagine cops in Leadville have an excessive amount to do. He gave us both a lecture about how dangerous – and illegal – it is to stop in the middle of the highway and that it is illegal to hitchhike outside of designated areas (I actually thought it was illegal everywhere) and sent us on our way. I dropped off the thankful homeless man outside of town and continued onto a grueling but beautiful hike up Elbert.

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Come to think of it, I might have picked up the highway-stopping habit up in Japan too. For some reason, they think that as long as your hazard lights are on, anywhere is fair game to completely block traffic. But legality aside, I do think this was a case of doing the moral, yet illegal thing. There were no places to stop along the highway, and this guy would have had to walk at least 10 miles into town. Sorry cop, I know you yelled at me but given the choice, I would probably do the same thing again.

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The Chicken Fiasco and Thoughts from My August

August has proven an interesting month. It’s the only full month I will spend in the United States this year. It’s also been full of business trips, pickleball tournaments, Japanese tourists, hotel management, and yes, house sitting for chickens.

The month began in Omaha, Nebraska where I played in the State Games of America pickleball tournament. I participated in both singles and doubles – being fortunate enough to win a gold medal in each. The city of Omaha and the drive there underwhelmed me, but I had fun. Check out a couple of the videos from the tournament.

After the State Games I returned to Colorado to begin my job as a Japanese translator/tour guide. The groups and people I encounter during these days make the job exciting. I do everything from Junior High camping trips to investors researching $3 million homes. Interesting things always happen as evidenced in my last blog post, I work long days and receive meager pay, but it gives me a lot of freedom and I’m working towards my 10,000 hours necessary to become an expert.

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Between these trips I did a couple of other things. First, my friend and doubles partner at the Tournament of Champions Matt came to check out Colorado and play some pickleball. I also listed my parent’s house on Air B&B last year, thinking we could make use of our 5 empty bedrooms. I have had several inquiries but the timing never worked out until now, when a college student from CC in his last couple weeks of school needed a quiet place to write his senior thesis. Check out our listing if you’re ever interested in a B&B in Colorado Springs.

Finally, part of my August consisted of house sitting for a friend on vacation. Predictably, the house part was easy: the 3 Chihuahuas and 6 chickens proved to be more complicated. When taking this assignment, the chickens didn’t seem like such a big deal. You feed them in the morning and evening, make sure they have enough water and collect their eggs. Or so I was told. Little did I know, an unidentified predator (that I have some choice words for) chose this very window of opportunity to launch his attack on my chickens. In the middle of the night I hear a commotion outside. By the time I look around, it’s quiet and I can’t see anything. Having to leave for a business trip the next day at 5:00 am, I entrust my mom with their care and making sure all 6 remain. I receive the worst new possible, she looks in the yard and finds the mutilated carcass of a chicken. I also find out that I have locked the dogs in the house and taken the key to Indiana. She has to collect the chicken carcass, climb onto the porch with a ladder to get into the house, and attempt to herd the chickens into their pen to avoid the previous night’s disaster. At this last task she failed, stating quote, “I don’t do chickens” at which point another chicken is doomed to coyote food status. Being in Indiana for business, I could do nothing but contemplate my miserable failure at the simple task of keeping 6 chickens alive for 1 week. The next day, however, my mom and brother did return, successfully conjuring up the courage to catch the chickens and place them into the coop. We pressed on with no further losses, and my friend was understandably disappointed but realistic about the situation.

The incident did make me think, however. Things like organic farming conjure up all kinds of positive images in my mind. Living off the land, getting back to nature, reducing environmental impact… all good things. But when it comes down to it, I’m actually terrible at farming and hate manual labor. Same with camping. I have this idealized view that rarely if ever is satisfied. I like campfires but there are usually way more mosquitoes than I remembered and there’s a rock under my sleeping bag. Sometimes there is a gap between who we want to be and what we actually enjoy. There are also things like working out that only make us feel good after we have done them. Maybe part of being happy is doing the things you love and overcoming discomfort to find enjoyment in the things you want to love.

That was my August so far. Next week I take a group of Japanese hikers around the State for a week-long trip. We go to Rocky Mountain National Park, Pikes Peak, Mt. Elbert and Aspen, among some smaller stops along the way.

Pickleball Trip to Japan

DSC_5755AI try not to use my blog very often for personal endorsements or business purposes. However, rarely do you get to do what you’re interested in and passionate about as your job. For myself, taking a pickleball trip to Japan is just that. I am currently in the process of moving to Japan, where I want to help people have the vacation of a lifetime, experience the real Japan and have an adventure in the process.

Pickleball is also a great sport to be involved with. I think it’s starting to rally a generation of baby-boomers off their couches into a healthier, more active, and more social lifestyle. And younger generations are following.

With that, I want to my readers know about two exciting developments in my recent life. First, I am starting a company called Travel Nagano, see the facebook page here. The website is not quite there yet, but I have a blog, travelnagano.wordpress.com, which, like this blog I have been neglecting as of late.

Second, I am involved with a couple of the nation’s top pickleball players to bring a pickleball reconnaissance mission to Japan. We are looking for evangelical pickleball players who want to spread the sport, want to get better by learning from the best and are interested in learning about another culture with insight from tour guides who have lived in Japan for over a decade. You might also be asked by your fellow Americans to scout the future global competition…

10464351_10152551400018637_8169661294252424377_n 10.48.54 AMPlease let me know if you would be interested in something like this and I will send you more details.

Contact: pickleballdaniel@gmail.com

Dates: October 19-27, 2015 (This is time in Japan, excluding flights)

Price: $1950.00 (Does not include airfare)

There are a limited number of spaces available on this trip. The final number has not been decided but it will most likely be 15-20. Please let us know as soon as possible to ensure your place on this amazing trip!

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