Why Fukushima Should be on Your Japan Travel Bucket List

To the casual observer zipping by on the bullet train, everywhere in Japan can look similar at first glance. Japan is after all surrounded by ocean, 70% mountains and the rest is mostly either rice paddies or houses. But within this chain of islands the size of California, there is actually a tremendous amount of cultural, climactic, seasonal and culinary variation packed in. It takes a little digging, but Japan is a place that one can continue learning about forever. For me at least, that is what keeps me interested and constantly exploring Japan’s fascinating history, culture and natural treasures.

What makes Fukushima Prefecture special then? In the 10 years since the tsunami, by outsiders Fukushima has been defined by the tragedy that shaped it. I have to confess that I’m also guilty of this too. It’s easy to get an image of a place fixed in your head. But Fukushima is so much more than that. It has incredible natural beauty. It has a long, interesting history. Its food is sublime. And most importantly it is filled with people that love their home and want to share it with people like you and me. Let me tell you a little more about my time in Fukushima and why its worth checking out on your next trip to Japan.

First, nature in Tohoku is some of my favorite in Japan. Because it is one of the largest and least populated areas of the country, nature in Tohoku somehow seems more untamed and wild than the rest of the country. Indeed during the early part of Japanese history, Tohoku was the untamed North, the area past the wall that no respectable Japanese dared enter. A good example is Numajiri Onsen, where I got to visit on my last trip. Hiking 45 minutes into the mountains from the top of Numajiri Ski Resort, the trees give way to rock and a pungent sulfur smell permeates the air. This is how you now you are near Numajiri Onsen. Dropping down into the valley that can only be described as other worldly, there is a milky white hot spring river with the timber from abandoned mining buildings scattered around. Indeed up to a few decades ago, these were active sulfur mines used for weapons. They are abandoned now though and hot springs water has taken over the network of tunnels. We look around for an unclaimed bathing spot and hit upon one. Putting on my helmet and bathing suit, I bathe in my first ever completely natural river onsen, a truly unique experience. The coffee and cheesecake provided by the guide hits the spot and I finally feel like I have arrived.

A Lazy Onsen River

Another reason to visit is that the food in Tohoku and especially Fukushima is some of my favorite in Japan. While it doesn’t have Michelin star restaurants like Tokyo, the refined flavors of Kyoto or the loud street stalls of Osaka, food in Tohoku is unpretentious and comforting. It’s the soul food that will put some meat on your bones and get you through the long harsh Winters. Examples include Kitakata Ramen and Sauce Katsu in Aizu Wakamatsu, Kiritampo Nabe in Akita, Gyutan Yakiniku in Sendai. These are just some of the famous dishes that people from all over Japan come to try. I think the purity of the water and the environment create delicious ingredients and you can actually taste the difference. You can’t forget the sake too because some of the oldest and most famous breweries in Japan are from this region. Newer trends like craft beer are gaining popularity as well but whatever your preference, you’re going to like what is on offer.

Sake Tasting at Yamatogawa Shuzo

Next, Fukushima has some fascinating history and culture. During the Boshin War that ended the Edo Period, the Aizu Domain was the last supporter of the Tokugawa Shogunate. The plot for The Last Samurai is partly derived from a French military captain’s accounts during the Boshin War. Driving around the town of Aizu Wakamatsu, the taxi driver mentions where such and such battle took place or where the imperial army invaded etc. and as a student of Japanese history, it’s fascinating. Not only that, buildings like the Sazaedo Temple and Tsuruga Castle remain, adding to the impression that you have taken a step back in time. And for an even earlier Edo Period post town experience, you can visit the nearby Ouchi-juku thatched roof village.

Sazaedo Temple

Finally, people in Fukushima are just so darn friendly. From the waiter at the ryokan in Higashiyama Onsen telling us about which order to drink the sake in to bring out the most flavor, to the owner of Shiokawaya explaining every step of their farm to table ramen process, people here really love Fukushima and want to talk about it. They are proud of their home and their heritage. I never visited Fukushima before the tsunami, but I get a sense that it has brought people together rather than torn them apart Everyone is bonded by that common experience and while they will never forget, they also want to move forward and make this place better. Fukushima Friendly really is a thing, kind of like Minnesota nice or Southern hospitality.

Kitakata Ramen at Shiokawaya

Overall, I had a great trip and wanted to share my experience. Like I’ve said before, the Tohoku region and especially Fukushima are worth putting on your Japan travel bucket list when international travel resumes. For more ideas or itineraries, visit activetraveljapan.com. Thanks again and I hope to see you in Japan soon!

Hiking to Namekawa Onsen
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Team Japan

I often wonder what it is that drew me back to Japan. I grew up here of course and have that sense of belonging but so did my siblings and they are happily living in the US. What specifically made me want to come back and not them?

First, I can’t discount the influence of a single encounter. I was living in Colorado at the time when my sister told me about a ski resort that was looking for staff. Having nothing better to do I thought, “what the heck” and spent the Winter snowboarding in Shiga Kogen. I didn’t have any plans to move back to Japan until then and that single introduction probably changed my life. Who knows if I would have found a different path back to Japan (I have the feeling I might have) but when I spent that Winter in Nagano I knew I had to stay.

Now that I’m here though, there are a few specific reasons that I just like Japan better than anywhere else. First, Japan is an endlessly interesting place to study. Churchill’s riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma quote actually describes Japan better than Russia. There is a simultaneous depth of culture and weirdness that in my opinion is not found anywhere else. For example, any aspect of Japanese culture from its history, food (which has it’s own branches), art forms, religion etc. is a rabbit hole that you could spend years going down. As a guide, I’m constantly making new discoveries because of the sheer volume of things I want to know. After living here 23 years I’m still asked questions about Japan on every tour that stump me. Second, I relate to Japanese peoples’ personalities better. Most Americans are willing to bare their life stories within a couple of meetings but in Japan – as with myself – it takes some time. It’s not that Japanese people don’t open up, someone just has to be in the inner circle before they do. There are a few ways to get into that inner circle including alcohol and speaking Japanese so I often experience a side of Japanese people that someone who doesn’t speak Japanese simply can’t. And perhaps superficially, Japanese food is just healthier and higher quality than American food of the same price. It’s easy to eat healthy and feel good here whereas in America it takes a conscious, concerted effort.

Another reason I have stayed is that I feel like I have more to contribute than I would living in the US. Speaking English and Japanese in Japan is a valuable skillset whereas in the US it wouldn’t be a significant advantage. In the US the competition for everything from houses to jobs to venture funding is fierce whereas in Japan, there just aren’t as many people competing for the same resources. Macro economically competition is good so it’s the reason the US is so far ahead but as an individual, it’s nicer being in a small pond. I definitely have a competitive advantage here that I wouldn’t in the US. I stand out here and while I hated that as a kid, I realize that it’s valuable as an adult. It’s no exaggeration to say that everyone who meets me remembers me because I’m this weird white guy that speaks perfect Japanese and those connections often come in handy sometime later.

Finally, this is a bit simplistic but despite its issues, I fee like Japan is still one team. I hate to say it but being ethnically homogenous probably helps. And while I am not, as you may have noticed, ethnically Japanese, I do feel like I’ve been let onto the team. I feel like I have skills that can contribute to making a better society, to brining more business here and to diversifying Japan in a positive manner. That’s what makes living here interesting for me.

The 11 Best Things About 7-11 Japan

Everyone knows 7-Eleven is an American company right? Well, sort of. What is now known as 7-Eleven was started in the US in the 1920s, changing its name in the 1940s to 7-Eleven to reflect its unprecedented hours of operation. It expanded to the Japanese market in the 1990s, where the Japanese subsidiary did so much better than the parent company that the subsidiary bought the parent. Japan now has around 19,000 7-11s, almost a third of the global total (that’s not counting any other convenience stores, there are around 50,000 total in Japan). Needless to say, Japanese like their 7-11s (and convenience stores). Here are a few things, especially food, that make them so great and must-visit places when traveling in Japan.

They are truly convenient

There are ATM machines at all 7-11s (and post offices) in Japan that work with international cards, giving you 24 hour access to cash (because not being able to pay for much with credit cards is a decidedly inconvenient aspect of Japan). You can also pay your bills, transfer money, buy bus or airplane tickets, and much more at 7-11 ATMs.

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They have Traveler-friendly appliances like chargers and adapters

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They Have Pretty much anything else you need

Toothbrushes, toothpaste, razors, tissues, medicine, soap, shampoo, sunscreen, utensils, notebooks, pens, envelopes, batteries, disposable underwear and T-shirts, you name it – they’ve got it.

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Donuts

They are dangerously good, you should try them.

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The pancake Sandwich

Looking for a quick breakfast? 7-11 has “pancake sandwiches” that have maple syrup and butter inside! Such a good idea

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Drinkable Coffee

Okay, convenience store coffee is never going to be the best, but just lower your expectations and you will be completely satisfied! They  sell ice coffee cups with the ice already in them so you just take it to the register and after paying, push the ice coffee button (R or L) on the coffee machine.

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The wide selection of freshly made food

At 7-11s in America you get hot dogs past their prime and crusty pizza. In Japan, you have rice bowls, sushi, salads, curry, soup and a lot more that is all completely fresh.

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Rice Balls

Any convenience store in Japan is going to have a wide selection of these. You can try  classics like Tuna Mayo, Fried Rice and Salted Salmon to more exotic varieties like Cod Roe, Pickled Plum or Fermented Soy Bean. There are tabs marked 1, 2 & 3 on the plastic wrapping, follow them and you will open your rice ball flawlessly.

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Sandwiches

Sometimes Japanese put  weird things in sandwiches (and pizza for that matter) but usually they turn out pretty well. They always sell Western-friendly varieties like Egg Salad, Tuna and Ham/Cheese.

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These Potato Chips

Japan’s version of Kettle Chips are insanely good. The black pepper ones are awesome too.

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So many kinds of ice cream and popsicles for when it’s hot outside

I could only get half the varieties into the shot!

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